May 14, 2019 /

NZ MUSIC, SCREEN AND INTERACTIVE MEDIA CREATORS SPEAKING WITH ONE VOICE ON THE NEED FOR STRONGER COPYRIGHT

More than 30 New Zealand screen, music and interactive media creators have submitted a joint position paper to the Government’s review of the Copyright Act.  The group represents New Zealand film makers, television producers, broadcasters and home entertainment distributors, songwriters, composers, recording artists and music companies, production and post production companies, and interactive media and game developers.

‘Kiwi Creativity Doesn’t Just Happen’ outlines the participants’ shared priorities in the review of the Copyright Act. The paper can be read here.

April 8, 2019 /

The New Zealand Music Industry submission to the Copyright Act review

The New Zealand Music Industry has submitted a joint sector submission to the Copyright Act review. Industry and advocacy groups Recorded Music New Zealand, APRA AMCOS, Independent Music NZ (IMNZ), The Music Managers Forum (MMF NZ) and the NZ Music Commission Te Reo Reka O Aotearoa have set out the industry’s responses to the issues paper and  key priorities in the review of the Copyright Act.

Representing artists, songwriters, composers, record companies, distributors, music publishers, managers and many others involved in the creation of music, the submission explains how music’s contribution to Aotearoa is enabled and sustained by copyright.

To coincide with its submission to the Copyright Act review, the music organisations have also produced  The New Zealand Music Industry | Te Ahumahi Puoro o Aotearoa as a report on the state of the industry in 2019 with an introductory summary: Setting the Scene.  The documents explain who we are and what we do, and are essential background to the industry’s response to the Issues Paper. They include information on the economic, social and cultural contribution of the music industry to New Zealanders’ wellbeing, how we have embraced and adapted to the digital environment and the multiplicity of licensed ways for consumers to enjoy music.

New Zealanders all benefit from a thriving music ecosystem: culturally, socially and economically.  A robust copyright framework is an essential element of that ecosystem both to ensure sustainable growth, and to allow the freedom to explore, experiment and take the creative risks that allow us to lead, express our uniqueness, and drive our artform forwards.

The Copyright Act provides a sound framework, however in light of the rapid digital transformation of the music industry and the related challenges, there are some key issues that must be addressed to ensure that it continues to foster sustainable growth into the future.  This is essential both to preserve New Zealand’s national and cultural identity, and to develop our position as exporters on the world stage.

The industry is asking that the NZ copyright framework recognises the value of music, for its contribution to our social and cultural wellbeing as well as to the economy and employment.

The industry’s priorities are that the copyright law:

  • Enables creators and investors to obtain fair value for their work through being able to choose who can use their music and on what terms;
  • Provides effective tools to enable creators and investors to safeguard music against unauthorised uses;
  • Is clear and provides for legal certainty, respects market solutions and recognises that licensing fuels innovation, not exceptions;
  • Harmonises New Zealand’s laws in line with those of our trading partners, to maximise export success;
  • Reflects Aotearoa New Zealand’s rich cultural diversity and contributes to ensuring that all our voices, including those of tangata whenua and our diverse communities, can be valued and heard.

READ / DOWNLOAD PDFs

Setting the Scene – Summary of music industry submission to Copyright Act review (11 pages, 6.2MB)

The New Zealand Music Industry | Te Ahumahi Puoro o Aotearoa (106 pages, 9.1MB)

The New Zealand Music Industry submission to the Copyright Act review (398 pages, 9.5MB)

March 28, 2019 /

NZ recorded music revenues top $100 million in 2018

Another year of growth led by streaming

Aotearoa’s recorded music industry recorded a fourth straight year of revenue growth in 2018, increasing by 7.7 per cent to $107.9 million.

Streaming is now undeniably king of New Zealand’s music landscape, accounting for 69 per cent of all recorded music revenue in 2018 and totalling $74.2m. Services like Spotify and Apple Music have fundamentally changed the way Kiwis access and engage with music – giving us access to our favourite artists at the press of a button and on any device.

Recorded Music New Zealand CEO Damian Vaughan said the reduced entry barriers for new artists releasing music and ways in which they can connect with fans has helped the industry grow.

“It’s a very exciting time for New Zealand music, there’s a real optimism and buoyancy in the local industry after four years of growth. Artists are finding new fans and audiences everywhere and there is increased investment going towards developing our local talent.”

Whilst streaming has grown enormously these past few years digital downloads and physical music remain important contributors, representing five per cent and 10 per cent in industry revenue respectively. The resurgence of vinyl has also continued, with vinyl sales now making up 20 per cent of all physical music purchases.

Public Performance and Communication income remained stable in 2018 and newly included in this year’s revenue figures is a small but important revenue stream – synchronisation. A ‘synch’ is when a song is included in an advertisement, television programme, film or video game and in some instances can expose an artist’s music to entirely new audiences.

Ensuring Future Growth

Damian Vaughan says that to ensure the music industry continues to cultivate viable careers for our artists we need to build on this momentum, support our creatives and ensure that their intellectual property is protected. The Government is currently undertaking a review of the NZ Copyright Act and Recorded Music actively engaged with officials in this process alongside our industry colleagues.

“2018 was a very positive year, and our sector is certainly very optimistic about the future and the opportunities ahead. We are looking to government to protect our artists’ rights, ensure rights holders receive fair and equitable treatment, and to create the right conditions to expand our position as exporters on the world stage, while preserving our unique New Zealand identity.”

 

January 15, 2019 /

Nominations Open For Best Country Music, Best Children’s Music, And Best Jazz Artist Awards

Recorded Music NZ are pleased to announce that nominations for Best Children’s Music Artist, Best Country Music Artist, and Best Jazz Artist are open.

If you have released a Children’s Music, Country Music, or Jazz album (or 5 single releases) during the period 1 January 2018 – 31 December 2018 you could be eligible to enter one of our genre NZ Music Awards.

Entries for the APRA Best Country SongAPRA Best Jazz Composition, and APRA Best Children’s Song, as well as the NZ On Air Best Children’s Music Video are also open.

2019 NZ Country Music Awards

The NZ Country Music Awards celebrate the best in local country music, and are comprised of the Recorded Music NZ Best Country Music Artist and APRA Best Country Music Song, as well as the MLT Songwriting Awards.

Held in Gore each year, The NZ Country Awards are presented by the The New Zealand Songwriters Trust, and have been running since 2011. ‘An exceptional evening celebrating the craft of New Zealand Country Music’

2019 NZ Jazz Awards

The NZ Jazz Awards recognise excellence and creativity in the broad world of jazz, and will be held on closing night of this year’s Wellington Jazz Festival, celebrating the achievements of the NZ Jazz community. The awards are comprised of the Recorded Music NZ Best Jazz Artist tui, and the APRA Best Jazz Composition Award.

2019 NZ Children’s Music Awards

The Children’s Music Awards champion the music especially created for our youngest music fans.

Presented at a special ceremony in May, we recognise the achievements of our children’s music creators with the Recorded Music NZ Best Children’s Music Artist tui, the APRA Best Children’s Music Song award, and the NZ On Air Best Children’s Music Video award.

Terms and Conditions can be found HERE

To enter your nomination for the Recorded Music NZ Best Country Music Artist, Best Jazz Artist, or Best Children’s Music Artist please CLICK HERE

If you have any questions please contact Sarah Owen at sarah@recordedmusic.co.nz.

December 21, 2018 /

2017 Economic Contribution of the Music Industry

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Recorded Music NZ has released the 2017 Economic Contribution of the Music Industry report. The report was commissioned by Recorded Music NZ with the support of industry organisations APRA AMCOS and The NZ Music Commission and conducted by PWC.

The report reveals that the New Zealand music industry contributed $639 million to New Zealand’s GDP and 5,500 full time equivalent jobs (FTEs) in 2017, via indirect effects. This contribution grew markedly in 2017 and was primarily driven by strong growth in streaming revenues and live music.

The two largest contributors were music radio broadcasting and live music performance (concerts, festivals, or music venues). Music radio broadcasting contributed $279 million and live music performance contributed $168 million, which collectively amounts to 70 per cent of the music industry’s 2017 total GDP contribution.

The next largest subsector: Music retailing – the physical and digital sales of music, including traditional and store-based retailing, online stores and payments for online music streaming services – generated a total economic impact of $112 million and the equivalent of 509 full-time jobs.

Public Performance of music contributed $39 million to the economy and produced the equivalent of 350 full-time jobs. This sub-sector includes broadcast royalties received by Recorded Music NZ and APRA AMCOS via their direct licensing activities, and also includes royalties from music played in public such as at retailers, hospitality outlets, education facilities and gyms as licensed by OneMusic.

The smallest sub-sector – Synchronisation, referring to the royalties earned from licensing music for use in advertisements, games, films and television programmes, contributed $5 million and the equivalent of 51 full-time jobs to the economy.
Also included is an estimation of overseas earnings by New Zealand musicians based on survey data. This is revenue earned outside New Zealand for live performances overseas, and recordings and publishing overseas. As no survey was conducted for this report a three-year average of the 2014-16 period was derived for this year’s estimate of $36 million.

Download the full report here

November 27, 2018 /

NZ screen and music organisations welcome progress on Copyright Act review

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New Zealand screen and music organisations have welcomed the release of the Issues Paper on the review of the Copyright Act as an important step in the review process.

The organisations represent the interests of local and international creators in the music, film and television production and distribution sectors.  These sectors make a major cultural and economic contribution to New Zealand and provide jobs for thousands of New Zealanders.

The organisations are keen to ensure that the voice of the sector is heard in the review, and that the Government understands the importance of a robust copyright framework to a strong music and screen industry in New Zealand.

New Zealand’s copyright laws have not been updated in over a decade and the organisations believe that the review is a positive opportunity to update them to ensure that they continue to support and underpin New Zealand’s creative talent into the future.

Jo Oliver General Counsel for Recorded Music NZ, said:

“Music is a defining element of our culture and from Lorde to Six60, New Zealand musicians are enjoying success both here and overseas.

“Music fans are the winners in all of this and can now access music in more ways than ever before.  But this success doesn’t just happen – its essential New Zealand has the right copyright framework that enables full and fair value to be returned to those who create and invest in music.

“We look forward to working with government as it considers these issues as part of the review.”

Cate Slater, TVNZ Director of Content said:

“Local content is a taonga and it’s important that we protect it, as well as the talented people who make it.

“The current law was designed for a pre-internet age, but the growth of online has seen the way we consume content change dramatically.

“We welcome the opportunity to discuss how copyright can better support the local production community in New Zealand today. To us, the conversation is necessary to ensure a wealth of homegrown content for future generations.”

Sophie Moloney, General Counsel for Sky Television, said:

“There is more television content on offer than ever before, but every show you watch is the result of the hard work of the actors, the sportspeople, the directors, the production crew, to name a few.

“Broadcasters like SKY are focused on delivering those shows in ways that work for our customers, and having sound copyright protection in place is important for every contributor in that process.

“We welcome the opportunity to work with Government and colleagues across the creative sector to ensure that the copyright regime supports creators and distributors of great television content – so that we can all keep making it and enjoying it.”

Paul Muller, CEO for Australia New Zealand Screen Association, said:

“Copyright holders in New Zealand have embraced the digital environment and today great movies and TV shows are available in a multitude of digital formats and models.

“This Issues paper offers an opportunity for all New Zealand content creators to be heard and recognised, and to enable them to keep creating and for New Zealanders to enjoy the great stories they tell.”

November 23, 2018 /

Music Doesn’t Just Happen: Recorded Music NZ welcomes progress on Copyright Act review

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Recorded Music New Zealand has welcomed the release by the Government of the Issues Paper on the review of the Copyright Act.

“It’s an exciting time to be a music fan in New Zealand, and the music industry has been a leader in the digital environment, but for this to continue it is essential that we have fit for purpose copyright laws”, said Recorded Music NZ CEO, Damian Vaughan.

“The New Zealand music industry employs over 2000 Kiwis directly and contributes over $550 million to our GDP per year, and with artists like Lorde and Opetaia Foa’I we are making our mark globally.

“This success doesn’t just happen though.  Copyright is the lifeblood of our industry, enabling recording artists and all the other Kiwis who work in the industry to be paid for their work, and supporting ongoing investment by record companies in finding and nurturing creative talent.

“For this to continue, it is essential that New Zealand has the right copyright framework.

“While the Copyright Act provides a sound framework, some key adjustments are needed to bring it into line with the reality of today’s market.

“The review provides an opportunity to do this and to make the law more robust and effective and the release of the Issues Paper is an important step in the process.

“We thank MBIE and the Minister for their work on the review to date and we look forward to working through the Issues Paper in detail and making a full submission on it.”

Recorded Music NZ last month launched a position paper setting out the New Zealand music industry’s priorities for the review.

The paper, Music Doesn’t Just Happen, outlines the vital role that a robust copyright system plays in supporting New Zealand music, the need for fair and full value to be returned to those who create and invest in music, and the key issues that need to be addressed in the review.

Music Doesn’t Just Happen sets out a roadmap for the Government to address certain key issues, to help ensure a sustainable future for Kiwi recording artists and all those employed in our local music industry, and continued investment in developing great talent and delivering it to music fans in New Zealand and around the world”, says Vaughan.

“We have singled out four key issues that we believe need to be addressed in the review.

“We are asking the Government to ensure fair market conditions for negotiations with digital platforms, provide for effective enforcement of copyright online, harmonise New Zealand’s copyright term with that of other OECD countries and give recording artists and record companies a fair go on copyright exceptions.

“We will now be focused on engaging with the Government and other stakeholders over the review process to ensure that these priority areas are addressed and that our music industry can continue to thrive”, concluded Vaughan.

The full Recorded Music NZ paper, Music Doesn’t Just Happen can be found here.

 

November 16, 2018 /

Celebrating the past, present and future at the 2018 Vodafone New Zealand Music Awards Top New Zealand musicians celebrated at the 2018 ceremony

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Six60 has cemented their place as a powerhouse in Aotearoa’s music scene, claiming five Tui at the 53rd Vodafone New Zealand Music Awards at Spark Arena in Auckland tonight.

After selling out Western Springs for their only gig this summer, the group received THREE Best Group, Highest Selling Album, Vodafone Highest Selling Single and NZ On Air Radio Airplay Record of the Year Award, presented by the man behind the 2018 Tui redesign Dick Frizzell.

They also claimed the coveted Vodafone People’s Choice. For the first time, this award was open to all finalists, further highlighting the band’s popularity with the public.

After winning a Tui for Best Music Video for his track ‘Vampire Again’ at the 2018 Artisan Awards at Massey University, Wellington last week, Marlon Williams was celebrated once again on the Vodafone New Zealand Music Awards stage – taking out Best Solo Artist and the Hallensteins Album of the Year for his 2018 album Make Way for Love.

This brings Marlon’s total Tui number up to five, after winning Best Male Solo Artist and Breakthrough Artist of the Year at the 2015 Vodafone New Zealand Music Awards.

Newcomers Drax Project were also big winners tonight. They’ve been recognised with the Jaguar Breakthrough Artist of the Year and Vodafone Single of the Year for ‘Woke Up Late’, which resonated with kiwi music fans throughout 2018.

Funkadelic soul superstar Troy Kingi has been recognised with both Te Māngai Pāho Best Māori Artist and Best Soul/R&B Artist after releasing the genre-bending Shake That Skinny Ass All the Way to Zygertron

Aotearoa hip hop pioneers Upper Hutt Posse were inducted into the Te Whare Taonga Puoro/New Zealand Music Hall of Fame and received the 2018 Tohu Whakareretanga/Legacy Award. A powerful tribute performance of “E Tu” by Che Fu and The Kratez, featuring 14 year old DMC DJ World Champ K-Swizz closed out the evening ceremony.

The 2018 International Achievement recipient was Brooke Ligertwood who is one of the top selling and most popular New Zealand recording artists of all time.

More widely known in Aotearoa under Brooke Fraser, where her albums have been certified 15x Platinum, her recent work with worship group Hillsong earned her a Grammy earlier this year for Best Contemporary Christian Music Performance/Song under her married name.

After kicking the ceremony off with a high energy performance of “Kai Tangata”, Alien Weaponry hasbeen recognised with the Tui for Best Rock Artist for 2018.

Their debut album in June reached #5 on the New Zealand album charts, and since releasing it the band have had a whirlwind year of international tour and success.

Psychedelic rockers Unknown Mortal Orchestra won Best Alternative Artist and Kiwi songstress Kimbra received The Edge Best Pop Artist, while Best Hip Hop Artist and Best Electronic were awarded to SWIDT and Chores, respectively.

Sons of Zion were awarded Best Roots Artist, Equippers Revolution received Best Worship Artist, and Eve de Castro Robinson won Best Classical Artist for 2018.

Recorded Music NZ CEO Damian Vaughan said the calibre of musicians in Aotearoa continues to impress year on year, and 2018 is no exception.

“The quality of music being created and recorded in Aotearoa is world-class. Each and every Tui awarded tonight was incredibly well deserved and I personally look forward to seeing what the future holds for both these musicians – finalists and winners alike – and the musicians of tomorrow.”

The 2018 Vodafone New Zealand Music Awards were hosted by Stan Walker and Kanoa Lloyd and featured a more intimate set up than previous years, utilising multiple stages to refocus the awards on Aotearoa’s abundance of musical talent.

Tonight there were performances from Six60, Alien Weaponry, Robinson, Drax Project, JessB, Sons of Zion, a special In Memoriam performance by Stan Walker and an amazing tribute performance by Che Fu and The Kratez for the 2018 Legacy Award recipient Upper Hutt Posse.

Tui recipients who received their awards during the year are:

  • Best Jazz Artist: Umar ZakariaFearless Music
  • Best Folk Artist: Albi & The WolvesOne Eye Open
  • Best Pacific Album: Ladi 6Royal Blue 3000 EP
  • Best Children’s Artist: Levity BeetMy Best Friend Jake Is A Cyborg
  • Best Country Artist: Reb FountainHopeful and Hopeless
  • Best Album Cover: Jaime Robertson & Matthias HeiderichIn Spaces EP (Sola Rosa)
  • Best Music Video: Marlon Williams – ‘Vampire Again’ (Marlon Williams)
  • Best Engineer: Jordan Stone & Simon GoodingOut Of Silence (Neil Finn)
  • Best Producer: Simon Gooding, Tom Larkin, Hammerhead (Alien Weaponry)
  • Music Teacher of the Year: Elizabeth Sneyd – Virtuoso Strings Charitable Trust, Porirua
November 7, 2018 /

The NZ Music Foundation has changed name to MusicHelps, and we’re honoured to welcome our new Patron: Lorde!

Music Helps

Since the charity began in 2012, we have invested in 66 projects, with 42 partners, from Whangarei to Invercargill, all using the power of music to change the lives of over 60,000 New Zealanders in need.

Now we’re rebranding to MusicHelps, a name that is more direct, more impactful and speaks to the heart of our core purpose.

We’re also announcing that multi award-winning artist Lorde will become our latest patron, joining founding patron Neil Finn. The ‘Greenlight’ singer has experienced first-hand the power and impact of music in her life.

“It’s an honour to be joining Neil Finn as a Patron of MusicHelps. Since the start of my journey, our local music industry has consistently shown me so much support and compassion, and it’s a privilege to be able to help give back,” says Lorde.

“Community care is a huge part of what makes our industry the family that it is and utilising the power of music to help as many people as possible is a mission that speaks to me on many levels. I can’t wait to get started.”

We’re going to continue the important work we started five years ago, developing and supporting projects that use music to change the lives of those who are at-risk, vulnerable or experiencing serious health challenges. We’re also going to continue provide world-leading emergency assistance to kiwi music people experiencing illness, distress and hardship.

Thank you for your support.


Take a look at our new video and look out for more updates from us in the coming weeks!

October 25, 2018 /

Music Doesn’t Just Happen: Music Industry stakes out position on Copyright Act review

Recorded Music New Zealand has today launched a position paper setting out the New Zealand music industry’s priorities for the upcoming review of the Copyright Act.

The paper, Music Doesn’t Just Happen, outlines the vital role that a robust copyright system plays in supporting music in New Zealand, the need for fair value to return to those who create and invest in music, and the key issues that the Copyright Act review needs to address.

“It’s an exciting time to be a music fan in New Zealand, with more options than ever before for fans to experience music how and when they want. The music industry has been a leader in the digital environment, investing in new business models and driving innovation.

But music doesn’t just happen – there is a huge investment of time, money and human resources behind the scenes. For this investment to continue it is essential that New Zealand has the right copyright framework”, says Recorded Music NZ CEO, Damian Vaughan.

“While the Copyright Act provides a sound framework, some key adjustments are needed to bring it into line with the reality of today’s market.

Music Doesn’t Just Happen sets out a roadmap for the Government to do this, to help ensure a sustainable future for Kiwi recording artists and all those employed in our local music industry, and continued investment in developing great talent and delivering it to music fans in New Zealand and around the world.

“In particular we have singled out four key issues that we believe need to be addressed in the review.

“We are asking the Government to ensure fair market conditions for negotiations with digital platforms, provide for effective enforcement of copyright online, harmonise New Zealand’s copyright term with that of other OECD countries and give recording artists and record companies a fair go on copyright exceptions.

“The New Zealand music industry employs over 2000 people directly, contributing over $550 million to GDP per year and with artists like Lorde and songwriters like Opetai Foa’i, it is clear that we are making our mark globally.

To secure the right environment for local and export success now and in the future it’s vital to address the issues we have highlighted. We look forward to working with the Government on this as they progress their work programme”, concluded Mr Vaughan.

The Government is expected to release an issues paper on the Copyright Act review by year end.

The full Recorded Music NZ paper Music Doesn’t Just Happen can be found here.