October 10, 2019 /

Artisan Award finalists announced, plus Folk Nominations Open Now

MUSIC MANAGERS ADDED TO THE TALENT CELEBRATED AT VNZMA ARTISAN AWARDS

Six awards will be presented at the Artisan Awards on 4 November

Recognising Aotearoa’s extraordinary behind-the-scenes music talent, the fourth annual Artisan Awards will be celebrated at Massey University’s School of Music and Creative Media Production in Wellington on 4 November.

Five New Zealand Music Awards will be presented: Massey University Best Producer | Te Kaiwhakaputa Toa, Best Engineer | Te Kaipukaha Toa, NZ On Air Best Music Video | Te Puoro Ataata Toa, Best Album Artwork | Te Toi Ataata Pukaemi Toa and Music Teacher of the Year | Kaiārahi Puoro o te Tau. And for the first time, the Music Managers Forum (NZ) will be presenting the Recorded Music NZ Music Manager of the Year at the Artisan Awards also.

Recorded Music New Zealand CEO Damian Vaughan says the calibre of talent in Aotearoa’s music scene is enormous – and the fact that the Artisan Awards are growing every year is testament to that.

“For the fourth year in a row, we’re recognising the producers, engineers and artists that help and support the phenomenal musicians making music throughout New Zealand.

“This year, alongside the MMF (NZ) we’re also shining a light on those responsible for managing fostering newcomers and industry veterans alike. We’re excited to celebrate the year that was and look forward to the next 12 months for Aotearoa’s music industry.”

The Massey University Best Producer finalists for 2019 are Josh Fountain for his work with BENEE, Foley, LEISURE, and MAALA, Simon Gooding, Ji Fraser, and Eli Paewai for their production of Mitch James’ self-titled debut album, and Tom Healy for his great work on Tiny Ruins’ Olympic Girls.

Taking the stage twice, LEISURE’s Josh Fountain is also a finalist for Best Engineer for his work, including his band’s track ‘Easy Way Out’. Joining him is 2x Tui winner Simon Gooding for Mitch James Mitch James, and Ben Lawson and Vivek Gabriel for their work with Avantdale Bowling Club’s self-titled album.

Finalists for NZ On Air Best Music Video for 2019 is Jason Brock for his creative work on the single ‘Feeling Free’ by LEISUREMartin Sagadin who worked with co-director Aldous Harding on crafting her video for ‘The Barrel’, and Vision Thing for their incredible work on ‘Rock Bottom’ by Randa.

This year’s finalists for Best Album Artwork include last year’s winner Jaime Robertson for his creative work on Rhian Sheehan’s album A Quiet Divide, Mike Braid for the quirky album art on Villainy’s third album Raised in the Dark, along with Tim Harper and Dick Frizzell for their work on Offering – an album of gospel hymns 17 years in the making, released in memory of the tragic Christchurch massacre earlier this year.

After being introduced last year, the Music Teacher of the Year will once again be celebrated at the Artisan Awards. This year, the finalists were selected from over 200 nominations received for 76 individual music teachers/mentors across Aotearoa.

For the second year in a row, Jane Egan from Gisborne Girls High School is a finalist, alongside Duncan Ferguson from St Andrews College in Christchurch and Sue Banham from Rosehill College in Papakura, Auckland.

In addition to the five Tui awarded on the night, this year the MMF (NZ) will present the Recorded Music NZ Music Manager of the Year at the Artisan Awards.

With 15 years under her belt as a music manager in NZ, Lorraine Barry is a finalist for her work with some of Aotearoa’s biggest acts including Vodafone New Zealand Music Award’s finalist Avantdale Bowling Club and founding member of 2019’s Hall of Fame inductees Th’ Dudes and singer songwriter Dave Dobbyn. Christchurch band nomad round out her stable of artists.

CRS Music Management represent several of our up-and-coming artists, including MAALA, Jon Lemmon, and Openside, and manager Paul McKessar is the man behind them. He also works closely with 2019 VNZMA finalist BENEE and helped launch her career, which includes a platinum single in New Zealand and Australia and sold out shows in Melbourne and Sydney.

Niel de Jong and Oliver Kraemer are the final music managers in the running for the Music Manager of the Year Award for their work with thrash metal band Alien Weaponry, who won Best Rock Artist I Te Kaipuoro Rakapioi Toa at the Vodafone New Zealand Music Awards last year.

Niel has been involved with the music industry since the 1980’s as a musician and engineer before shifting to music education and management, while Oliver holds a BA in Music Business and a MA in Art and Media Management. He began his journey in Berlin as assistant manager to legendary German punk band Beatsteaks.

MMF chair Teresa Patterson says: ’The MMF are incredibly honoured to be able to present the Manager of the Year award as part of the Artisans Awards. It elevates the recognition of the important and tireless work Music Managers do behind the scenes for their artists. The calibre and quality of the nominees were of a very high standard, which has been reflected in the three finalists.

Andre Ktori, Head of School, School of Music and Creative Media Production at Massey University says: “We are really pleased to be hosting the 2019 Artisan Awards again at the College of Creative Arts.

“We are super excited to see an award for best music manager this year, a great addition to the awards. Hosting the awards and the Tui Music Series is great for Wellington and a great fit for our world-class music school.”

The 2019 Artisan Awards begin at 7pm on Monday 4 November and will be streamed on both the Massey University College of Creative Arts and the official NZ Music Awards Facebook pages, so people can tune in from anywhere in Aotearoa to celebrate alongside the Kiwi music industry.

 

Artisan Award Finalists

Massey University Best Producer | Te Kaiwhakaputa Toa:

  • Josh Fountain – (Various)
  • Simon Gooding, Ji Fraser, Eli Paewai – Mitch James (Mitch James)
  • Tom Healy – Olympic Girls (Tiny Ruins)

NZ On Air Best Music Video | Te Puoro Ataata Toa:

  • Jason Brock – ‘Feeling Free’ (LEISURE)
  • Martin Sagadin and Aldous Harding – ‘The Barrel’ (Aldous Harding)
  • Vision Thing – ‘Rock Bottom’ (Randa)

Best Album Artwork | Te Toi Ataata Pukaemi Toa:

  • Jaime Robertson – A Quiet Divide (Rhian Sheehan)
  • Mike Braid – Raised in The Dark (Villainy)
  • Tim Harper & Dick Frizzell – Offering (Various Artists)

Best Engineer | Te Kaipukaha Toa:

  • Ben Lawson & Vivek Gabriel – Avantdale Bowling Club (Avantdale Bowling Club)
  • Josh Fountain – (Various)
  • Simon Gooding – Mitch James (Mitch James)

Music Teacher of the Year | Kaiārahi Puoro o te Tau

  • Jane Egan (Gisborne Girls High School)
  • Duncan Ferguson (St Andrews College, Christchurch)
  • Sue Banham (Rosehill College, Auckland)

Recorded Music NZ Music Manager of the Year (presented by Music Managers Forum NZ)

  • Lorraine Barry
  • Niel de Jong & Oliver Kraemer
  • Paul McKessar

 

Nominations are open for the 2020 Best Folk Artist | Te Kaipuoro Taketake Toa

The Auckland Folk Festival is New Zealand’s largest folk music and dance festival. Come and celebrate the 47th annual festival at the Kumeu Showgrounds on Auckland Anniversary Weekend.  With international guest artists, musicians from around New Zealand, six stages, and 2020’s Best Folk Artist tui presented on the Sunday evening there is something for everyone!

Entry for Best Folk Artist 2020 is open to NZ Folk Artists with recordings released between 1 October 2018 and 30 September 2019.

Full Terms & Conditions of entry can be found here.

When you are ready to submit a nomination, please log in HERE. Entries must be submitted online. To be eligible for judging entries must be submitted to Recorded Music NZ before 5pm on Friday 1st November.

The winner/s will be announced and the Tui trophy presented at the Auckland Folk Festival on the evening of Sunday 26 January 2020.

September 26, 2019 /

Announcing the finalists for the 2019 Vodafone New Zealand Music Awards

Diverse range of genres showcase chart-topping local Kiwi talent
The Vodafone New Zealand Music Awards | Ngā Tohu Puoro o Aotearoa today announce a strong group of 2019 Tui finalists, with alternative music leading the pack.

Indie pop band The Beths released their debut album Future Me Hates Me in 2018 and lead the nominations this year with five nods. They have been nominated for Best Alternative Artist | Te Kaipuoro Manohi Toa, Album of the Year | Te Pukaemi o te Tau, Vodafone Single of the Year | Te Waiata Tōtahi o te Tau for ‘Little Death’, Best Group | Te Roopu Toa and Smirnoff Breakthrough Artist of the Year | Te Kaituhura Puoro Toa o te Tau.

Nineteen-year-old sensation BENEE has had a whirlwind year. Her debut single ‘Soaked’ has been certified platinum in New Zealand, she released her debut EP FIRE ON MARZZ and she has embarked on headline tours across New Zealand and overseas.

She’s nominated for four Tui including THREE Best Solo Artist | Te Kaipuoro Takitahi Toa, Smirnoff Breakthrough Artist of the Year, The Edge Best Pop Artist | Te Kaipuoro Arotini Toa and Vodafone Single of the Year for ‘Soaked’.

After smashing the charts with her sophomore album Party in 2017 and winning two awards at the 2017 Music Awards – Breakthrough Artist of the Year and Best Alternative Artist – Aldous Harding is back after releasing her third album Designer earlier in 2019.

This year, she’s a finalist for four categories including Album of the Year, Vodafone Single of the Year for ‘The Barrel’, THREE Best Solo Artist and Best Alternative Artist.

Kiwi hip hop artist Tom Scott’s jazz-inspired hip hop project Avantdale Bowling Club was three years in the making, but only took one week to reach #1 in the NZ Album Charts.  Described by Tom as ‘a self-help book addressed to myself’, this self-titled debut is up for three Tui at this year’s awards including THREE Best Solo Artist, Best Hip Hop Artist | Te Kaipuoro Hipihope Toa and Album of the Year.

LA based pop titans Broods came back in 2019 with their hotly anticipated third album Don’t Feed The Pop Monster. No strangers to the Vodafone New Zealand Music Awards, the duo are finalists for Album of the Year, Best Group and The Edge Best Pop Artist.

Mitch James was up for Single of the Year at last year’s Vodafone New Zealand Music Awards for his catchy “21”, which was certified Gold. This year, he’s nominated for THREE Best Solo Artist, The Edge Best Pop Artist and Album of the Year for his self-titled debut.

The next wave of New Zealand hip hop is well represented with teenagers Church & AP. After releasing their debut EP Cathedral / All Purpose in April, the South Auckland boys have become the local duo to watch. Their track ‘Ready or Not’ is nominated for Single of the Year, and the two are in the running for Smirnoff Breakthrough Artist of the Year and Best Hip Hop Artist as well.

Troy Kingi’s mission to create 10 albums in 10 years continues with the release of his 3rd instalment Holy Colony Burning Acres, a deeply personal and spiritual examination of the plight of First Nations peoples around the world. A 2018 winner of the Best Soul/RnB and Best Māori Artist Tui, Troy Kingi & The Upperclass are up for Te Māngai Pāho Best Māori Artist | Te Kaipuoro Māori Toa and Best Roots Artist | Te Kaipuoro Taketake Toa for 2019.

After a three-year hiatus, doom metal band Beastwars made their triumphant return to music with the release of their fourth studio album IV in 2019. The album was critically acclaimed, supported by a nationwide tour, and debuted at #1 on the NZ Music Charts. Now the band is nominated for Best Group and Best Rock Artist | Te Kaipuoro Rakapioi Toa at this year’s music awards.

Founded by the legendary Kora brothers Brad and Stu, L.A.B. have established a name for themselves as a cornerstone of the Kiwi summer circuit. Their unique blend of soulful-rock and electronic-funk continues on their second album L.A.B II and after being released this year, the band are finalists for Best Group and Best Roots Artist.

Wellington singer songwriter Louis Baker has been releasing music since 2013, but his 2019 debut album Open has propelled him into the mainstream eye – and for good reason. This collection of songs hones Baker’s neo-soul sound and sees him up for Te Māngai Pāho Best Māori Artist and Best Soul/RnB Artist | Te Kaipuro Awe Toa.

The other finalists include Rei (Te Māngai Pāho Best Māori Artist, Best Soul/RnB Artist), , Marlon Williams (Album of the Year), Drax Project (Vodafone Single of the Year), Six60 (Vodafone Single of the Year), BAYNK (Smirnoff Breakthrough Artist of the Year), Racing (Best Rock Artist), Villainy (Best Rock Artist), Tiny Ruins (Best Alternative), Bailey Wiley (Best Soul/RnB Artist), Diggy Dupè (Best Hip Hop Artist), and Lost Tribe Aotearoa (Best Roots Artist).

Pacific Heights (Best Electronic Artist | Te Kaipuoro Tāhiko Toa), Sweet Mix Kids (Best Electronic Artist), TALI (Best Electronic Artist), Equippers Worship (Best Worship Artist | Te Kaipuoro Kairangi Toa), Harbourside Worship (Best Worship Artist), Jules Riding (Best Worship Artist), Michael Houstoun & Bella Hristova (Best Classical Artist | Te Kaipuro Inamata Toa), Simon O’Neill (Best Classical Artist) and The Linkwood Guitar Duo (Best Classical Artist) are also finalists at this year’s Vodafone New Zealand Music Awards.

All finalists are eligible for the Vodafone People’s Choice Award | Te Kōwhiri o te Nuinga, which is announced at the 2019 Vodafone New Zealand Music Awards on 14 November. Voting for the Vodafone People’s Choice Award will be opening soon to the public.

Recorded Music New Zealand CEO Damian Vaughan says the 2019 group of finalists are incredibly talented and it’s thrilling to see them succeed locally and internationally.

“We have a phenomenal music scene here Aotearoa, a real community that encourages and fosters development and growth,” says Vaughan.

“And now we see these artists and their music finding audiences and success overseas, across streaming services throughout the world. It makes me proud to be a part of the ever-evolving and growing Kiwi music industry.”

The recipients of the Vodafone Highest Selling Artist | Te Toa Hoko Teitei, NZ On Air Radio Airplay Record of the Year | Te Rikoata Marakerake o te Tau and the International Achievement | Tohu Tutuki o te Ao Award will also be announced at the 2019 Vodafone New Zealand Music Awards.

We will also be celebrating the recipient of Music Teacher of the Year | Kaiārahi Puoro o te Tau  at the main event, as well as Th’ Dudes induction into the New Zealand Music Hall of Fame | Te Whare Taonga Puoro o Aotearoa.

The Vodafone New Zealand Music Awards | Ngā Tohu Puoro o Aotearoa will be broadcast live on THREE on 14 November from 8.30pm. General public tickets can be purchased through Ticketmaster.

September 24, 2019 /

IFPI RELEASES MUSIC LISTENING 2019 A global snapshot of music engagement

IFPI, the organisation that represents the recorded music industry worldwide, today released the Music Listening 2019 report, which examines the ways in which music consumers aged 16 – 64 engage with recorded music across 21 countries.

Report highlights:

  • Music listening is up. Respondents typically spend 18 hours per week listening to music – up from 8 hours in 2018. This equates to about 2.6 hours – or the equivalent of listening to 52 three-minute songs – daily.
  • Most people (54%) identify as ‘loving’ or being ‘fanatical’ about music. Among 16 – 24-year-olds, this rises to 63%.
  • Older age groups increasingly embrace audio streaming services. Engagement with audio streaming globally is strong, with 64% of all respondents accessing a music streaming service in the past month – up by about 7% over 2018. The highest rate of growth for engagement is in the 35 – 64-year-old age group, with 54% of that group accessing a music streaming service in the past month (+8% on 2018).

 Copyright infringement remains a challenge for the music ecosystem. 27% of all surveyed used unlicensed methods to listen to or obtain music in the past month, while 23% used illegal stream ripping services – the leading form of music piracy.

Frances Moore, chief executive of IFPI, said: “This year’s report tells an exciting story of how fans are increasingly engaging with music. At a time when multiple forms of media vie for fans’ attention, they are not only choosing to spend more of their time listening to – and engaging with – music but they are doing so in increasingly diverse ways.

“The enduring partnership between record companies and artists is the bedrock on which this growing, exciting global world of passionate music listeners is built. Record companies work with their artists to help connect them with fans around the world.

“The report also highlights that the availability of music through unlicensed methods, or copyright infringement, remains a real threat to the music ecosystem. Practices such as stream ripping are still prevalent and return nothing to those who create and invest in music. We continue to coordinate world-wide action to address this.”

The full report is available here

September 24, 2019 /

Aotearoa’s top Māori musicians to be celebrated at 2019 Vodafone Music Awards | Ngā Tohu Puoro o Aotearoa

Today we’re announcing the three finalists for Te Māngai Pāho Best Māori Artist | Te Kaipuoro Māori Toa at the 2019 Vodafone New Zealand Awards. Rei, Troy Kingi and Louis Baker have been recognised for their contribution as Māori musicians to Aotearoa’s local music scene and Te Ao Māori.

Rei has been making waves in Aotearoa’s music scene in recent years. He released the EP Rangatira in 2018, which was acclaimed for the unique Kiwi take on traditional trap music while featuring lyrics entirely in Te Reo.

Earlier this year, he released his third album The Bridge and continues to link the gap between genres, language and culture. With his concoction of smooth-talking R&B, hip hop and pop undertones, mixed with strongly rooted Māori heritage, the album’s a strong statement from one of Aotearoa’s most exciting talents. Rei is also a finalist for Best Soul/RnB Artist | Te Kaipuoro Awe Toa.

On a mission to release 10 albums in 10 years, Kerikeri-based musician Troy Kingi has done it again with the release of his third album Holy Colony Burning Acres, a deeply personal and spiritual examination of the plight of First Nations peoples around the world.

Under the moniker Troy Kingi & The Upperclass he’s nominated for both Best Māori Artist and Best Roots Artist | Te Kaipuoro Taketake Toa at this year’s awards after winning the Best Soul/RnB and Best Māori Artist Tui in 2018 for Shake That Skinny Ass All The Way To Zygertron, his epic funk-infused sophmore album taking inspiration from sci-fi soul, interstellar love and 70s cosmic funk.

Louis Baker has been cultivating a huge fanbase since 2013, who have finally been rewarded for their patience with the release of his debut album Open this year. The record features Baker’s uplifting anthem ‘The People’ which captures the loving unity and diversity of Baker’s hometown.

Growing up in the working-class suburb of Newtown, Wellington, Louis developed his passion for music at an early age listening to his parent’s diverse record collection, which featured the likes of Miles Davis, Marvin Gaye and Jimi Hendrix – sparking a lifelong obsession with music.

Recorded Music New Zealand CEO Damian Vaughan says the continued resurgence of Te Ao Māori in popular culture and music is inspiring, bringing a new cultural lens to New Zealand society.

“Across a diverse range of genres, it’s clear that Māori musicians are stepping into the spotlight and achieving the success they deserve,” says Vaughan.

“The growing amount of unique Māori identities we’re hearing on the radio and on streaming services is simply incredible. I look forward to seeing these three artists – and their Māori music contemporaries – push the envelope and continue to embrace and explore Te Ao Māori in their art.”

The winner of the 2019 Te Māngai Pāho Best Māori Artist will be announced at the Vodafone New Zealand Music Awards | Ngā Tohu Puoro o Aotearoa on 14 November from 8.30pm and broadcast live on THREE

 

 

September 19, 2019 /

Announcing the first annual MusicHelps NZ Music T-Shirt Day

Get involved in raising funds for the Vodafone New Zealand Music Awards official charity partner

On Friday 8 November, Kiwis are encouraged to wear their favourite kiwi artist or band tee and donate to MusicHelps, a charity dedicated to developing and sustaining projects that use music to help and heal people in need in our community.

The official charity of the Vodafone New Zealand Music Awards, MusicHelps is a kiwi charity that has helped over 60,000 people across Aotearoa with health issues, vulnerable, disabled and who are at risk.

How to take part

To participate, sign up at nzmusictshirtday.org.nz, make a donation, proudly wear your favourite NZ music T-Shirt on November 8, then post your pics with the hashtag #nzmusictshirtday to let us all know about it.

You can create a team and get your workplace, school, and/or social media networks involved. You can easily search for, and donate to, your favourite team via the “Donate to a Team” button or via the Team’s “Honour Roll” on the website.

Don’t have a NZ music t-shirt? No worries!

The good sorts at JB Hi-Fi, Bravado and seven of our greatest music artists are here to help.

Th’ Dudes, Herbs, Lorde, Six60, Shihad, Split Enz and True Bliss have all generously donated brilliant heritage designs for a set of exclusive, limited edition NZ Music T-Shirt Day shirts which will be available from JB HiFi stores and online from 12th October. If you don’t want to miss out you can pre-order your favourite design now here.

MusicHelps General Manager Peter Dickens says he’s thrilled with the initial response to NZ Music T-Shirt Day from the local music industry, from businesses, schools and music lovers everywhere.

“Wearing our favourite band or artist t-shirt gives us a real connection to our favourite kiwi artists and brings us closer to the powerful and positive emotions in the music we all enjoy. NZ Music T-Shirt Day is a flagship project MusicHelps organises in Aotearoa to raise awareness and funds to carry out vital work  helping thousands of people in need around the country.

“Plus it’s a great chance to bust our your favourite band t-shirt and wear your heart on your sleeve!”

MusicHelps is the official charity partner of the Vodafone New Zealand Music Awards.

Awards spokesperson and Recorded Music CEO Damian Vaughan can’t wait to see New Zealanders embrace the initiative.

“Whether you dig up an old favourite band t-shirt or get one of the official tees from JB Hi-Fi, we encourage everyone to get behind MusicHelps and support NZ Music T-Shirt Day.

“Kiwi music enriches our lives and MusicHelps is an organisation that makes amazing projects possible around our country to help those in our community who are most in need. We share a common belief in the power of music to make our world a better place and I can’t wait to see NZ music t-shirts across Aotearoa on 8 November.”

The 2019 Vodafone New Zealand Music Awards | Ngā Tohu Puoro o Aotearoa are being held at Spark Arena on 14 November. Viewers can watch the show live on THREE or purchase tickets from Ticketmaster.

Thanks again to our official T Shirt Day sponsors – Recorded Music, JB Hifi, Bravado, and Phantom – for their support this November.

 

Get involved in raising funds for the Vodafone New Zealand Music Awards official charity partner

On Friday 8 November, Kiwis are encouraged to wear their favourite kiwi artist or band tee and donate to MusicHelps, a charity dedicated to developing and sustaining projects that use music to help and heal people in need in our community.

The official charity of the Vodafone New Zealand Music Awards, MusicHelps is a kiwi charity that has helped over 60,000 people across Aotearoa with health issues, vulnerable, disabled and who are at risk.

How to take part

To participate, sign up at nzmusictshirtday.org.nz, make a donation, proudly wear your favourite NZ music T-Shirt on November 8, then post your pics with the hashtag #nzmusictshirtday to let us all know about it.

You can create a team and get your workplace, school, and/or social media networks involved. You can easily search for, and donate to, your favourite team via the “Donate to a Team” button or via the Team’s “Honour Roll” on the website.

Don’t have a NZ music t-shirt? No worries!

The good sorts at JB Hi-Fi, Bravado and seven of our greatest music artists are here to help.

Th’ Dudes, Herbs, Lorde, Six60, Shihad, Split Enz and True Bliss have all generously donated brilliant heritage designs for a set of exclusive, limited edition NZ Music T-Shirt Day shirts which will be available from JB HiFi stores and online from 12th October. If you don’t want to miss out you can pre-order your favourite design now here.

MusicHelps General Manager Peter Dickens says he’s thrilled with the initial response to NZ Music T-Shirt Day from the local music industry, from businesses, schools and music lovers everywhere.

“Wearing our favourite band or artist t-shirt gives us a real connection to our favourite kiwi artists and brings us closer to the powerful and positive emotions in the music we all enjoy. NZ Music T-Shirt Day is a flagship project MusicHelps organises in Aotearoa to raise awareness and funds to carry out vital work  helping thousands of people in need around the country.

“Plus it’s a great chance to bust our your favourite band t-shirt and wear your heart on your sleeve!”

MusicHelps is the official charity partner of the Vodafone New Zealand Music Awards.

Awards spokesperson and Recorded Music CEO Damian Vaughan can’t wait to see New Zealanders embrace the initiative.

“Whether you dig up an old favourite band t-shirt or get one of the official tees from JB Hi-Fi, we encourage everyone to get behind MusicHelps and support NZ Music T-Shirt Day.

“Kiwi music enriches our lives and MusicHelps is an organisation that makes amazing projects possible around our country to help those in our community who are most in need. We share a common belief in the power of music to make our world a better place and I can’t wait to see NZ music t-shirts across Aotearoa on 8 November.”

The 2019 Vodafone New Zealand Music Awards | Ngā Tohu Puoro o Aotearoa are being held at Spark Arena on 14 November. Viewers can watch the show live on THREE or purchase tickets from Ticketmaster.

Thanks again to our official T Shirt Day sponsors – Recorded Music NZ, JB Hifi, Bravado, and Phantom – for their support this November.

September 19, 2019 /

Finalists announced for New Zealand Music Teacher of the Year Tui

Today, Recorded Music New Zealand announces the three finalists for the second annual Music Teacher of the Year | Kaiārahi Puoro o te Tau Tui, with each being recognised for their incredible impact on their students and the local community.

For the second year in a row, Jane Egan from Gisborne Girls High School is a finalist, alongside Duncan Ferguson from St Andrews College and Music Learning Centre Ltd in Christchurch and Sue Banham from Rosehill College in Papakura, Auckland. These three finalists were selected from 200 nominations received for 76 individual Music Teachers/Mentors across Aotearoa.

Recorded Music New Zealand CEO Damian Vaughan said it is a privilege to celebrate Aotearoa’s top music teachers and the significant impact they have on so many New Zealanders.

“For the second year we have reviewed the incredible work of the best music teachers in Aotearoa. The guidance they give our rangatahi on their creative journeys can’t be overstated, it’s one of the main reasons our music industry is thriving,” said Vaughan.

“Amongst hundreds of deserving candidates, Jane, Duncan and Sue stood out as teachers really making a difference in their local communities. Recorded Music NZ is proud to be presenting one of these amazing people with a Tui this November.”

Transforming Through Music

Nominated for her second year in a row, Jane Egan has certainly made an impact on hundreds of children’s lives as Head of Department at Gisborne Girls High School.

She believes in the magic of the music room, where students transform from shy and insecure to flourishing individuals – passionate and confident in their ability to compose and play music.

This year, Gisborne Girls High School is again home to two choirs, a combined-schools orchestra and six chamber groups, as well as 12 Rockquest bands and 15 entries in the Rockquest Solo/Duo competition.

“I encourage students to try everything – just because they have never written a song before doesn’t mean they can’t. Just because they haven’t ever heard their voice recorded doesn’t mean they can’t sing,” said Jane.

“Finding what makes a student tick is really about building positive relationships with them, about being patient and listening. This is not always easy but if we are asking students to show tolerance and perseverance, we have to role model this too.”

Bustling Curricular and Co-Curricular Activity

Duncan Ferguson is the Head of Music at St Andrew’s College in Christchurch, where he manages 30 co-curricular groups across all genres of music from orchestra and chamber music to jazz, rock and electronica.

More than 140 students are involved in these groups, which he fosters in the local community. In the classroom Duncan redesigns his courses annually to maximise student motivation and engagement.

“My students are not allowed to ask “what do I need to do to get excellence?”. We are always looking at where they are at as performers, composers, producers, musicologists and what do they need to do to get better,” said Duncan.

His students have strong representation in national competitions. Under Duncan’s stewardship, rock groups have flourished at the school, with ten band’s entering in this year’s Rockquest (the most of any Christchurch school).

The orchestral programme at St Andrew’s is equally as strong, numbering around 60 students a year. There are six groups entered into this year’s Chamber Music Competition, and last year the school made regional finals at the event.

“We are not just a classical school, or a rock school, or a technology school, we are all of those and so much more,” said Duncan.

International Aspirations

Since becoming Head of Department for music at Rosehill College, Sue Banham has worked with students from Year 9 to Year 13 on their musical journey.

Over the past 14 years, Sue has worked with students to organise ‘Concert Music Tours’, where they performed in schools, churches, and public venues – connecting with musicians in other parts of the world and forging lifetime memories.

On top of travelling the North Island and South Island, Sue has toured with her students through Australia, Singapore, Malaysia and Argentina. She even had a group perform on the Great Wall of China.

“I want to continue to enable students to experience the fulfilment as a musician feels when contributing to the overall sound of a band,” said Sue.

“I strongly believe that students need to have a place at school where they feel they belong and can be accepted for who they are. I am committed to providing students with ensembles to which they can belong and feel the sense of family.”

The 2019 Music Teacher of the Year will be announced in November at the VNZMA Artisan Awards, held at Massey University in Wellington The winner will be celebrated again at the 2019 Vodafone New Zealand Music Awards | Nga Tohu Puoro o Aotearoa on 14 November. Viewers can watch the show live on THREE or purchase tickets from Ticketmaster.

May 14, 2019 /

NZ Music, Screen and Interactive Media Creators Speaking With One Voice On The Need For Stronger Copyright

More than 30 New Zealand screen, music and interactive media creators have submitted a joint position paper to the Government’s review of the Copyright Act.  The group represents New Zealand film makers, television producers, broadcasters and home entertainment distributors, songwriters, composers, recording artists and music companies, production and post production companies, and interactive media and game developers.

‘Kiwi Creativity Doesn’t Just Happen’ outlines the participants’ shared priorities in the review of the Copyright Act. The paper can be read here.

April 8, 2019 /

The New Zealand Music Industry submission to the Copyright Act review

The New Zealand Music Industry has submitted a joint sector submission to the Copyright Act review. Industry and advocacy groups Recorded Music New Zealand, APRA AMCOS, Independent Music NZ (IMNZ), The Music Managers Forum (MMF NZ) and the NZ Music Commission Te Reo Reka O Aotearoa have set out the industry’s responses to the issues paper and  key priorities in the review of the Copyright Act.

Representing artists, songwriters, composers, record companies, distributors, music publishers, managers and many others involved in the creation of music, the submission explains how music’s contribution to Aotearoa is enabled and sustained by copyright.

To coincide with its submission to the Copyright Act review, the music organisations have also produced  The New Zealand Music Industry | Te Ahumahi Puoro o Aotearoa as a report on the state of the industry in 2019 with an introductory summary: Setting the Scene.  The documents explain who we are and what we do, and are essential background to the industry’s response to the Issues Paper. They include information on the economic, social and cultural contribution of the music industry to New Zealanders’ wellbeing, how we have embraced and adapted to the digital environment and the multiplicity of licensed ways for consumers to enjoy music.

New Zealanders all benefit from a thriving music ecosystem: culturally, socially and economically.  A robust copyright framework is an essential element of that ecosystem both to ensure sustainable growth, and to allow the freedom to explore, experiment and take the creative risks that allow us to lead, express our uniqueness, and drive our artform forwards.

The Copyright Act provides a sound framework, however in light of the rapid digital transformation of the music industry and the related challenges, there are some key issues that must be addressed to ensure that it continues to foster sustainable growth into the future.  This is essential both to preserve New Zealand’s national and cultural identity, and to develop our position as exporters on the world stage.

The industry is asking that the NZ copyright framework recognises the value of music, for its contribution to our social and cultural wellbeing as well as to the economy and employment.

The industry’s priorities are that the copyright law:

  • Enables creators and investors to obtain fair value for their work through being able to choose who can use their music and on what terms;
  • Provides effective tools to enable creators and investors to safeguard music against unauthorised uses;
  • Is clear and provides for legal certainty, respects market solutions and recognises that licensing fuels innovation, not exceptions;
  • Harmonises New Zealand’s laws in line with those of our trading partners, to maximise export success;
  • Reflects Aotearoa New Zealand’s rich cultural diversity and contributes to ensuring that all our voices, including those of tangata whenua and our diverse communities, can be valued and heard.

READ / DOWNLOAD PDFs

Setting the Scene – Summary of music industry submission to Copyright Act review (11 pages, 6.2MB)

The New Zealand Music Industry | Te Ahumahi Puoro o Aotearoa (106 pages, 9.1MB)

The New Zealand Music Industry submission to the Copyright Act review (398 pages, 9.5MB)

March 28, 2019 /

NZ recorded music revenues top $100 million in 2018

Another year of growth led by streaming

Aotearoa’s recorded music industry recorded a fourth straight year of revenue growth in 2018, increasing by 7.7 per cent to $107.9 million.

Streaming is now undeniably king of New Zealand’s music landscape, accounting for 69 per cent of all recorded music revenue in 2018 and totalling $74.2m. Services like Spotify and Apple Music have fundamentally changed the way Kiwis access and engage with music – giving us access to our favourite artists at the press of a button and on any device.

Recorded Music New Zealand CEO Damian Vaughan said the reduced entry barriers for new artists releasing music and ways in which they can connect with fans has helped the industry grow.

“It’s a very exciting time for New Zealand music, there’s a real optimism and buoyancy in the local industry after four years of growth. Artists are finding new fans and audiences everywhere and there is increased investment going towards developing our local talent.”

Whilst streaming has grown enormously these past few years digital downloads and physical music remain important contributors, representing five per cent and 10 per cent in industry revenue respectively. The resurgence of vinyl has also continued, with vinyl sales now making up 20 per cent of all physical music purchases.

Public Performance and Communication income remained stable in 2018 and newly included in this year’s revenue figures is a small but important revenue stream – synchronisation. A ‘synch’ is when a song is included in an advertisement, television programme, film or video game and in some instances can expose an artist’s music to entirely new audiences.

Ensuring Future Growth

Damian Vaughan says that to ensure the music industry continues to cultivate viable careers for our artists we need to build on this momentum, support our creatives and ensure that their intellectual property is protected. The Government is currently undertaking a review of the NZ Copyright Act and Recorded Music actively engaged with officials in this process alongside our industry colleagues.

“2018 was a very positive year, and our sector is certainly very optimistic about the future and the opportunities ahead. We are looking to government to protect our artists’ rights, ensure rights holders receive fair and equitable treatment, and to create the right conditions to expand our position as exporters on the world stage, while preserving our unique New Zealand identity.”

 

January 15, 2019 /

Nominations Open For Best Country Music, Best Children’s Music, And Best Jazz Artist Awards

Recorded Music NZ are pleased to announce that nominations for Best Children’s Music Artist, Best Country Music Artist, and Best Jazz Artist are open.

If you have released a Children’s Music, Country Music, or Jazz album (or 5 single releases) during the period 1 January 2018 – 31 December 2018 you could be eligible to enter one of our genre NZ Music Awards.

Entries for the APRA Best Country SongAPRA Best Jazz Composition, and APRA Best Children’s Song, as well as the NZ On Air Best Children’s Music Video are also open.

2019 NZ Country Music Awards

The NZ Country Music Awards celebrate the best in local country music, and are comprised of the Recorded Music NZ Best Country Music Artist and APRA Best Country Music Song, as well as the MLT Songwriting Awards.

Held in Gore each year, The NZ Country Awards are presented by the The New Zealand Songwriters Trust, and have been running since 2011. ‘An exceptional evening celebrating the craft of New Zealand Country Music’

2019 NZ Jazz Awards

The NZ Jazz Awards recognise excellence and creativity in the broad world of jazz, and will be held on closing night of this year’s Wellington Jazz Festival, celebrating the achievements of the NZ Jazz community. The awards are comprised of the Recorded Music NZ Best Jazz Artist tui, and the APRA Best Jazz Composition Award.

2019 NZ Children’s Music Awards

The Children’s Music Awards champion the music especially created for our youngest music fans.

Presented at a special ceremony in May, we recognise the achievements of our children’s music creators with the Recorded Music NZ Best Children’s Music Artist tui, the APRA Best Children’s Music Song award, and the NZ On Air Best Children’s Music Video award.

Terms and Conditions can be found HERE

To enter your nomination for the Recorded Music NZ Best Country Music Artist, Best Jazz Artist, or Best Children’s Music Artist please CLICK HERE

If you have any questions please contact Sarah Owen at sarah@recordedmusic.co.nz.