• What does Recorded Music NZ do?

    Recorded Music NZ administers the rights of local and international record labels and recording artists within the New Zealand territory, including the Pacific Region. Music licensing is a significant part of what we do. Recorded Music NZ, either directly or through our OneMusic joint initiative with APRA, is responsible for licensing and collecting income from the broadcast, reproduction and public performance of sound and video recordings and then distributing this income back to rights’ holders. As well as licensing, Recorded Music NZ carries out an industry representation and advocacy role which includes producing the annual Vodafone Music Awards, publishing the Official NZ Top 40 Chart and protecting and promoting our members’ music through our ProMusic division.

  • What is OneMusic?
    OneMusic is a joint licensing initiative between APRA and Recorded Music NZ. Previously, businesses have needed a licence from both APRA and Recorded Music NZ to get all the legal permission needed to use music. Having to apply or two separate licences has been confusing and time consuming, so OneMusic was created to offer a single music licence covering all the permission needed for businesses and other organisations to play music in public.

  • Why does my business need a licence?
    Some business owners are surprised to learn they need a licence to play music. Using music in a commercial, business or any other public setting is a public performance or communication. Under the Copyright Act and owners of music copyrights are entitled to be asked their permission and to charge a fee for the use of their work.

  • What is a public performance?
    A public performance is the playing of music in a business, commercial or any other non-domestic setting. Just because a performance is given for free, the audience is small or you are playing music to the members of a club or society, this does not exclude it from being a public performance under the Copyright Act.

  • How much do licence fees cost?
    Licence fees take into account how music is used by different types of businesses and organisations, the value it offers, the size of a business and any other relevant factors that may have been raised by the industry groups or individual licensees. You can refer to this website for licence fees relating to television and radio broadcasting, internet music services and licensing in the Pacific Region. For details on public performance licence fees please visit www.onemusicnz.com.

  • I have paid for the music I play. Why do I need a licence?
    Simply buying music does not provide the rights to use this music in a commercial or public setting. Music is sold for private/domestic use, so any use of this music by a business or organisation is a public performance or communication that requires licensing. The same rule applies whether you have purchased a physical CD, bought a digital download or stream music through a subscription service.

  • Is licensing legal?
    Yes it is. The Copyright Act clearly establishes these public performance and communication rights. The Copyright Act also outlines the penalties for anyone in breach of the Act. The Copyright Act provides for a maximum $150,000 fine and/or 5 years imprisonment for breaches of the law.

  • Does this only happen in new Zealand?
    No. Similar copyright laws exist around the world and music licensing companies exist in many other territories around the world.

  • When should I apply for a licence?
    Anyone starting a new business should contact either Recorded Music NZ or OneMusic if their intention is to use music. Your licence will commence from the time your business starts using music. If you have only recently been made aware that your business requires a music licence you should apply immediately.

  • What music is covered by the public performance licence?
    OneMusic’s repertoire, through the membership of APRA and Recorded Music NZ, is vast. And it is added to daily as new music is created, released and registered with us. If you have any questions about whether the music you play is covered by the OneMusic repertoire please contact us on 0800 800 663.

  • Where does the money go?
    Recorded Music NZ pays all the income it receives, less administration costs, to copyright holders each year. Recorded Music NZ is a non-profit organisation and income is distributed based on detailed data collected from radio and television broadcasters.

  • How do you know what music I play?
    Wherever possible we try to match the licence income we receive with data on the music that has been played by that licensee. However, it would be unrealistic to expect every business and organisation to provide us with complete playlists of all the music they play. So, we distribute public performance income based on the detailed data we receive from radio broadcasters.

  • What do I receive if I hold a OneMusic licence?
    When you hold a OneMusic licence you can be sure your business is complying with copyright law and that the owners of the music you play are being paid for the use of their work. A OneMusic licence sticker lets your customers, guests or members know that you support the owners of the music you play by holding a music licence. You can also receive useful music related information from the OneMusic facebook and twitter pages and increasingly can find valuable music related information on the benefits music can offer to your business from the OneMusic website.

  • Is OneMusic a Government organisation?
    No. OneMusic is a joint initiative between APRA and Recorded Music NZ (previously PPNZ Music Licensing). Both APRA and Recorded Music NZ are non-government, non-profit organisations representing owners of music and the recordings of that music. To find out more about each organisation visit www.apra.co.nz and www.recordedmusic.co.nz

  • Why am I responsible for holding the licence?
    The person/business authorising a public performance is responsible for holding the public performance licence. While you may hire bands or DJs, it is the pub, club, bar or restaurant that is obliged to hold the licence.